Big Tree hunting at Giant’s Forest again on 9/20/15

Hello again,

This brings us up-to-date as of this writing.  On September 20th, 2015 we went big tree hunting with the owner of part of the Giant’s Forest, Bill Copren.  He took us up to measure a big Coast Douglas-Fir (Pseudotsuga Menziesii), with a Bird of Prey nest in the top.  It was 21′ 9″ around, or a DBH (Diameter at Breast Height) of 6.92′.  Then, after wandering around a bunch down to look at some other, smaller trees, we measured another Douglas-Fir.  This one came with a name: the Chuck Hardesty Tree, named after the late Charles Hardesty, who, as a scaler in the U.S Forest Service in the 1950s, said “Leave this tree; it’s too big and too beautiful”.  The Hardesty Tree measured out at 22′ 0″, equaling a 7.00′ DBH.  I also learned the name of the area with the two big pines and the big cedar, described in the last post.  It is known as Pasquetti Park, named after the family that was responsible for building the road.  The Hardesty tree had limbs on it that were as big as smaller trees (2.6′ est. DBH).  I don’t know this for a fact, but the Hardesty tree may be the largest Coast Douglas-Fir on the arid Eastern Sierra Nevada slope.  Now for the fun part:  Pictures!!

Mom next to the first Doug-Fir. She can reach 6′ 5″, that being the height of her fingertips from the ground.
Looking up the trunk of the first tree.
Looking up the trunk of the first tree.
Woodpecker damage on the first tree.
Woodpecker damage on the first tree.
A closer zoom of Mom next to the Hardesty Tree.
A closer zoom of Mom next to the Hardesty Tree.
Mom next to the Hardesty Tree.
Mom next to the Hardesty Tree.
The crown of the Hardesty Tree.
The crown of the Hardesty Tree.

And that brings us up to date. Thanks for reading!

Duncan.

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Discovery of the very large: Giant’s Forest

August 8th, the day we discovered Giant’s Forest, started with a day outing where my sister and I went with our grandparents on a hike.  After the long and adventurous hike, we got in the car and headed across a back road to check out a Red Fir (Abies Magnifica) that Grandpa had discovered earlier in the summer.  We measured it out at 17′ 0″ around, or a 5.41 foot diameter.  As we wandered back home in disappointment, suddenly I spotted a tree.  “Stop the car!” I yelled, and we stopped about 40 feet from an enormous Sugar Pine (Pinus Lambertiana).  We measured it at 22′ 4″ around, or a 7.08′ diameter.  Then nearby, we saw a very large Incense-Cedar (Calocedrus Decurrens).  It was measured at 18′ 6″ around, or 5.88′ in diameter.  This cedar had a burnt cavity in the bottom big enough for my 4′ 7″ tall sister to stand in comfortably.  Then nearby that Cedar, we found a large Ponderosa Pine.  It was 17′ 10″ around, or a diameter of 5.66 feet.  Afterwards, we measured the distance to the highway so that we could find a way to get back.  Here are some pictures:

Grandpa next to the Sugar Pine.  Note that from the ground to the tip of his fingers in this photo is 8 feet.
Grandpa next to the Sugar Pine. Note that from the ground to the tip of his fingers in this photo is 8 feet.

 

Grandpa again. His arm span is 8 feet, and distance to the top of his head is 6′ 4″.
My sister and grandmother next to the big cedar. Jade is 4′ 7″, and Grandma is 4′ 11″.
Jade next to the cedar from a distance of 50'.
Jade next to the cedar from a distance of 50′.
Grandma and Jade next to the Ponderosa.
Grandma and Jade next to the Ponderosa.
More of Jade and Grandma next to the Ponderosa.
More of Jade and Grandma next to the Ponderosa.

Cheers,

Duncan

The Beginning of it all: Olympic NP, WA

It all started with the first family vacation in 10 Years, to the rainforests of Olympic National Park, in Washington.  This place is home to some of the most magnificent old-growth forest in the world.  Here are some pictures of trees from the trip:

Three Hemlocks and a Stump, appearing to be one whole tree, Hoh Rain Forest.
Three Hemlocks and a Stump, appearing to be one whole tree, Hoh Rain Forest.
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Dad – height 5′ 8″ – walking under a tree root arch at the Kalaloch Big Cedar.
Big Maple covered in Moss, Hoh Rain Forest.
Big Maple covered in Moss, Hoh Rain Forest.
More of the Big Cedar.
More of the Big Cedar.
Spruce Tree Root Cave, Hoh Rain Forest.
Spruce Tree Root Cave, Hoh Rain Forest.
Trail going under two Douglas-Firs, Hoh Rain Forest.
Trail going under two Douglas-Firs, Hoh Rain Forest.

After we returned, I was talking about how awesome the trees were, when Grandpa came to me with the idea of doing a local big tree measuring project. I found that to be a very good idea. And thus, The Sierra County Big Trees Project was born.

Happy tree hunting,

Duncan

A Hello and Introduction to SCBTP

Hello there,

My name is Duncan, and I run the Sierra County Big Trees Project.  As of Late September, 2015, this project has been ongoing since June.  Since I have yet to create any posts to update the watchers of this site (if there are any), I shall make a bunch of posts to document what has happened in the several months between its inception and this post.  Anyway, thanks for stopping by, and please, take a look around. Also, if you would like to contact me by eMail with info, historical photos or other such things then please sent stuff to me at Duncan(at)Mainecoon.com. Please replace (at) with @, as this was done to thwart spammers.

Thanks,

Duncan