A monster among monsters: the Grandfather Tree

Hello all,

I’m going to make another post, this time about an event from exactly a week ago today.  On the 30th of September, 2015, I went with my grandparents and their friend Sharon up the Mountain House Road looking for plants and a giant sugar pine (Pinus Lambertiana).  Grandma and Grandpa had discovered the pine on their second trip up Mountain House with Sharon, back in June of 2015.  When we came to the pine, we got out and measured it at 25′ 0″ in circumference.  Then we used the clinometer to measure it at at least 143.11 feet in height (later on, in November, I met with Michael Taylor, and tested out the Criterion 400 laser rangefinder that he bought and then subsequently gave me, and after a lot of complex measurements, got a new height reading, accuracy of 1 foot or less, of 203.38 feet)  The crown spread is currently unknown, but it is BIG.  There is barely any taper for the first 110 feet or so.  Another thing to note is that out of one of the biggest branches, there appears to be a hemiepiphitic Douglas-Fir (Pseudotsuga Menziesii var. Menziesii) growing out of a small pocket of soil.  This is very exciting news, as it would be one of the first instances of that happening in the Sierra Nevada.  Also in the same area are three other large trees, a Black Oak (Quercus Kelloggii) and two Jeffrey Pines (Pinus Jeffreyi).  Afterwards was a luncheon on the serpentine barrens at the top of the hill, where I spied an Incense-Cedar (Calocedrus Decurrens) that may be fairly old considering the size of the tree and the poor quality of the soil.  Now for some HUGE photos:

Grandpa reaching up next to the behemoth.
Grandpa reaching up next to the behemoth.

DSCN8586

Relaxing next to the big pine.
Relaxing next to the big pine.
Grandpa next to the giant pine.
Grandpa next to the giant pine.

UPDATE:

There is also a photo that I must share; a scan of a black-and-white belonging to Sierra County Arts Council director B.J Jordan. The man second from right is her grandfather. This is NOT the Grandfather Giant, but a larger one also in the Goodyears’ Bar area.

Giant Sugar Pine.  Photo taken in the late 1800s-early 1900s.
Giant Sugar Pine. Photo taken in the late 1800s-early 1900s.
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3 thoughts on “A monster among monsters: the Grandfather Tree

  1. grandpa

    Well done Duncan! I think that you should point out to your readers your age as that makes this work that more impressive. By the way my hand height is 8 ft, not 9 ft.

    Like

  2. Bernadina

    A nice tree. We’ve got some big trees on the property.
    We’ve got out own Grandfather tree, a cedar that was already mature by the 1924 fire.

    Like

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