A hunt with an unexpected result: Sir Monty Cola and the other two giants

Hello,

I’m back again, and this time with an account of today’s adventure.  Today my family and I went in search of a mythical grove of Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum), that was planted sometime between the 1950s and the 1970s on top of the Yuba Pass by Charles “Chuck” Hardesty (remember his tree from the Return to Giant’s Forest entry?).  We searched and searched, and found two notable White Firs (Abies concolor), one with a large basal flare (and the only one with a picture here), and the other with a height of 98.6 feet, as well as a Jeffrey Pine (Pinus jeffreyi) with a circumference of 14′ 10″.  Then, after about 1 and 1/2 hours of fruitless searching, we started down the road towards a small valley called Lincoln Valley.  On the way around that loop, we spotted a tree off the road and down the hill.  When we reached the base of the tree, we found what sort of monster it was: a 6.44′ DBH, 20′ 3″ CBH, 97.6′ tall Western White Pine (Pinus monticola).  The tree had a root system with aboveground roots reaching 41.3 feet from the base of the tree.  The tree was named “Sir Monty Cola” as a pun on the Latin species name.  Then we popped down the road, and then stopped near another sizable White Pine.  This one was 17′ 5″ in circumference and 83 feet tall.  Not in the same league as Sir Monty, but still a big tree.  Finally, after a downhill stretch, we stopped just below a 21′ 3″ CBH, 102.1′ tall Red Fir (Abies magnifica).  It was the largest tree of the day, and also proved to be a USFS bearing tree.  After that, we headed on home, just missing a small rainstorm.  Now to show these trees to you-with pictures!

Me next to Sir Monty Cola
Me next to Sir Monty Cola
Side view of Sir Monty
Side view of Sir Monty
Grandma next to Sir Monty
Grandma next to Sir Monty
Grandma next to the HUGE Red Fir
Grandma next to the HUGE Red Fir
First bearing mark on the fir
First bearing mark on the fir
Second bearing mark on the fir
Second bearing mark on the fir
Grandma next to the fir with the basal flare.
Grandma next to the fir with the basal flare.

The problem with the two big White Pines is that they are on land owned by Sierra Pacific Industries (SPI). They also appear to be marked for logging. This is quite unfortunate, as Sir Monty may be among the largest White Pines alive today. If any readers can give any ideas as to how to save Sir Monty, then please comment.

Thanks,

Duncan

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4 thoughts on “A hunt with an unexpected result: Sir Monty Cola and the other two giants

  1. Michael Hogan

    Very impressive. No sequoiadendron yet?
    If that big marked tree is on SPI land, it may be worth a call to their PR person. They are trying to position themselves as environmentally sensitive these days and perhaps they might find just a bit of resonance between that ‘position’ and saving one of the true giants of the forest.

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  2. I am sitting in the Yuba Gallery with Donna Hayes who lives in Goodyears Bar. She saiys that the Grandpa tree has also survived two fires. It has also been struck by lightening. In 1972 Donna started a petition to stop the Forest Service from cutting down the tree. All the local loggers signed the petition and save the tree. Thank you for doing this research Duncan. We love the big trees!

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